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Recital
DYNAMIC PIANISM IN YAKUSHEV MARIN RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, January 23, 2022
Russian pianist Ilya Yakushev arrived Jan. 23 at his Mill Valley Chamber Music Society recital with the repute of playing loud and fast and delivering charming introductory musical remarks to his audience. He was true to form in Mill Valley’s Mt. Tamalpais Methodist Church, preceding Haydn’s sple
Symphony
THE SHOW MUST GO ON
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, January 9, 2022
The Jan. 9 Santa Rosa Symphony concert was supposed to feature the world premiere of Gabriella Smith’s first symphony, but it ended up featuring another type of premiere: a concert that was conceived, rehearsed and performed in less than eight hours. Symphony staff learned on Sunday morning that so
Choral and Vocal
AN OLD FRIEND RETURNS TO WEILL IN STERLING ABS MESSIAH PERFORMANCE
by Pamela Hicks Gailey
Sunday, December 19, 2021
A tremendous accomplishment by the American Bach Soloists Dec. 19 was near perfect performance of Handel's Messiah in Weill Hall. Long an annual tradition at San Francisco's Grace Cathedral, the ABS took to the road and delivered a Christmas gift of epic proportions to an obviously thrilled and enth
Symphony
SHOSTAKOVICH FIFTH THUNDERS AT WEILL HALL CONCERT
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, December 5, 2021
In a new season marketed as “Classical Reunion,” the Santa Rosa Symphony made a palpable connection with its audience at the early December set of three standing ovation concerts in Weill Hall. The December 5 concert, with 1,000 attending, is reviewed here. Vaughan Williams’ popular Fantasia on a T
Chamber
THE LINCOLN RETURNS WITH CLARKE'S PUNGENT TRIO
by Terry McNeill
Thursday, November 18, 2021
There were many familiar faces Nov. 18 during Music at Oakmont’s initial concert of the season, but perhaps the most necessary were the three musicians of the Lincoln Piano Trio, the Chicago-based group that has performed often in Oakmont since 2006. A smaller than unusual audience in Berger Audito
Symphony
NOSTALGIC BARBER KNOXVILLE AT SO CO PHIL JACKSON THEATER CONCERT
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, November 14, 2021
In their first Jackson Theater appearance of the new season the Sonoma County Philharmonic presented Nov. 14 a program devoid of novelty, but showcasing the “People’s Orchestra” in splendid performance condition after a long COVID-related layoff. Conductor Norman Gamboa drew a committed and boister
Chamber
THRILLING PIANO QUINTETS IN MILL VALLEY CHAMBER CONCERT
by Abby Wasserman
Sunday, November 14, 2021
The Mill Valley Chamber Music Society sprang back to life on November 14 when a stellar ensemble from the Manhattan Chamber Players, a New York-based collective, arrived to perform two piano quintets: Vaughn-Williams’ in C Minor (1903), little known and rarely performed; and Schubert’s in A Major D.
Chamber
MUSCULAR BRAHMS FROM IVES COLLECTIVE IN GLASER
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, November 14, 2021
Leaving SRJC’s Newman Auditorium for the first time in decades, the College’s Chamber Concert Series presented a season-opening concert Nov. 14 in Santa Rosa’s Glaser Center with the four-musician Bay-Area based Ives Collective. The season, the first given since 2020, is dedicated to Series Founder
Symphony
MONUMENTAL BRAHMS SYMPHONY HIGHLIGHTS MARIN SYMPHONY RETURN
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, November 7, 2021
In the waning COVID pandemic the Marin Symphony is one of the last Bay Area orchestras to return to the stage, and they did with considerable fanfare Nov. 7 before 1,200 in Civic Center Auditorium, with resident conductor Alasdair Neale leading a demanding concert of Brahms, Schumann and New York-ba
Symphony
APOLLO'S FIRE LIGHTS UP VIVALDI'S FOUR SEASONS IN WEILL
by Terry McNeill
Saturday, October 30, 2021
Long ago the Canadian violin virtuoso Gil Shaham played a program in Weill Hall of solo Bach, with a visual backdrop of slowly developing visuals, such as a pokey flower opening over four minutes. The Bach was sensational, and some in the audience liked the photos but many found them disconcerting,
SYMPHONY REVIEW
Sonoma State University Symphony Orchestra / Friday, December 11, 2015
Alexander Kahn, conductor. Marilyn Thompson, piano

Alexander Kahn and Marilyn Thompson Dec. 11

THE LITTLE ORCHESTRA THAT COULD

by Terry McNeill
Friday, December 11, 2015

Hearing a symphony’s inaugural concert is a special event, and the Sonoma State Symphony Orchestra Dec. 11 launched what should be a prosperous musical life with a Weill Hall concert. The University Music Department has had permanent chamber, band and jazz ensembles, but never a flesh-in-the-blood orchestra. Now they do.
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On paper Composer John Corigliano’s "Voyage" seemed a unique opening, but the eight-minute version for strings passed without much notice or interest. It’s reminiscent of Hovhaness and conductor Alexander Kahn led effectively with the music never rising about a mezzo piano. Eschewing the excitement of a lively season overture, it was an odd choice for a gala event.

Mozart’s D Minor Concerto, K. 466, was another matter, and pianist Marilyn Thompson joined the mix in a scrappy but ultimately satisfying reading of the work from 1785. Listeners wanting pitch-perfect playing with sharp attacks, cutoffs and integrated instrumental entrances would not have found it here, but the sonic balances were good and after the initially unsteady Allegro chords the masterful Mozart drama unfolded well.

Playing from score Ms. Thompson adopted an understated approach to the solo part, preferring elegance to high drama, and here and in the concluding movement played the cadenzas by Adolph Baller. Many (Alkan, Brahms, Beethoven, Busoni) have written cadenzas for the 20th Concerto, and I found Baller’s to be idiomatic and in places provocative, with sharp and unexpected modulations. The Romanze was performed with only limited use of rubato, and Ms. Thompson’s refined playing in the finale was her best of the evening. Marie Vizcaino was a splendid oboist, contrasting with a sporadically overly loud timpanist.

Following the shortest Weill Hall intermission in memory the concert concluded with Beethoven’s First Symphony, the Haydnesque one in C Major (Op. 21) from 1800. The opening “question and answer” pair of chords for winds, horns and plucked strings immediately caught my attention, with cadences that then emerged fully formed in focused playing of the small ensemble of 25. Mr. Kahn drew a good performance throughout, especially in the Menuetto: Allegro where there was welcome section clarity. At times in rapid upward passages the high string notes were blurred, something that will surely diminish with more performances.

Applause at the end was loud and often boisterous, as colleagues of the student musicians yelled for their favorites, and the conductor was returned three times to the stage.

Prior to the Corigliano Mr. Kahn, recently appointed to the SSU faculty, addressed the audience of 300 at length regarding the gestation of the Orchestra and opportunity to join a music department of increasing importance with the Green Center’s halls as a resplendent venue. At a post-concert reception the conductor told of plans for a May, 2016 concert, and the expectation of subsequently four concerts per season. That is a pleasurable prospect for North Bay music lovers.