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Chamber
THREE SONG CYCLES HIGHLIGHT VIBRANT SLV RECITAL
by Pamela Hicks-Gailey
Wednesday, May 08, 2019
An ambitious recital of vocal and piano music was presented May 8 at Santa Rosaís Spring Lake Village by mezzo-soprano Kindra Scharich and pianist Jeffrey LaDeur. The duo engaged the enthusiastic audience with scholarly friendliness and artistry in performances of Beethoven's short cycle of six song...
Symphony
ALEXANDER TORADZE DELIVERS A LESSON IN SERENITY
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, May 05, 2019
An entire concerto movement consisting of serene piano melodies over a soothing backdrop is probably not the first thing that springs to mind when seeing Shostakovichís name on an orchestra program, but thatís exactly what pianist Alexander Toradze delivered--twice--at Sundayís Santa Rosa Symphony c...
Symphony
MARIN SYMPHONY SEASON CLOSES WITH AUTUMNAL ELGAR AND THEATRICAL BEETHOVEN
by Abby Wasserman
Sunday, April 28, 2019
Mozartís enchanting Overture to his opera The Magic Flute, a miniature tapestry of gems from the 1791 work, opened the Marin Symphonyís final concert of the 2018-2019 season. Under conductor Alasdair Neale, the playing of the sprightly seven-minute piece by a reduced-size classical ensemble sparkled...
Recital
SHAHAM-EGUCHI DUO'S EXCITING MUSICAL GENEROSITY IN WEILL
by Abby Wasserman
Friday, April 26, 2019
Violinist Gil Shaham may be the most modest virtuoso on the concert stage today, and it is the great music he most wishes to put forward, never himself. Generosity, a quality he is known for, was abundantly clear in Weill Hall April 26 when he performed, with pianist Akira Eguchi, a generous program...
Recital
GLITTERING PIANISM IN LI'S OAKMONT RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Thursday, April 11, 2019
Piano prodigies have always been a fascination for the music public, and the greatest of them (some were Mozart, Mendelssohn, Liszt, Saint SaŽns, Hofmann) went on to legendary fame. George Li, who made is local debut at a Music at Oakmont recital April 11, was a remarkable recent keyboard prodigy t...
Symphony
SO CO PHIL'S SEASON CLOSER WITH EXPANSIVE PROKOFIEV 5TH IN JACKSON
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, April 07, 2019
Closing their 20th season with their usual programming aplomb, the Sonoma County Philharmonic played a provocative set of concerts April 6 and 7 in the Jackson Theater, the Orchestraís new home at the Sonoma Country Day School by the Sonoma County Airport. Local composer Nolan Gasserís Sonoma Overt...
Choral and Vocal
SISTINE CHAPEL INSPIRATION FOR THE TALLIS SCHOLARS IN WEILL HALL
by Sonia Morse Tubridy
Friday, April 05, 2019
Returning to Weill Hall April 5 after a seven year absence, the ten singers of the Tallis Scholars brought the sacred choral tradition of Palestrina and his contemporaries to an audience of delighted music lovers. Under the direction of Peter Phillips, the 1973 founder of the group, the program was...
Symphony
AUTUMNAL SIBELIUS 7TH HIGHLIGHTS VSO'S SEASON CLOSING CONCERT
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, March 31, 2019
Closing their 87th Season March 30 and 31 the Vallejo Symphony has moved from a single weekend concert to a set of two, and the late March response was two full houses in the charming downtown Vallejo Empress Theater. Conductor Marc Taddei opened the Sunday program with a rousing performance of B...
Recital
SHARED INSTRUMENTAL BEAUTY IN VIEAUX-MEYERS WEILL HALL CONCERT
by Abby Wasserman
Saturday, March 30, 2019
Exciting timbral sound and intricate counterpoint, made possible when two artists with complementary instruments play together, were richly explored by violinist Anne Akiko Meyers and guitarist Jason Vieaux March 30 in Weill Hall. Whether in close harmony, or unison, or weaving separate melodies to...
Chamber
RARE MAHLER QUARTET AT MILL VALLEY CHAMBER CONCERT
by Abby Wasserman
Sunday, March 24, 2019
Piano quartets are relatively rare in the classical literature, and there are only about 40 compositions for the combination of piano, violin, viola and cello, mostly from the Romantic period of the mid to late 1800s. It therefore was special March 24 to hear three great works of this medium, perfor...
CHAMBER REVIEW
Chris Botti Jazz Band / Sunday, August 12, 2018
Chris Botti, trumpet. Musicians TBA

Trumpter Chris Botti

EXTRAVAGANT FUSION OF STYLES AT CHRIS BOTTI BAND WEILL HALL CONCERT

by Jerry Dibble
Sunday, August 12, 2018

Trumpeter Chris Botti still performs in jazz venues including SF Jazz and The Blue Note, but now appears mostly in cavernous halls or on outdoor stages like the Sonoma State Universityís Green Music Center. He brought his unique road show to the packed Weill Hall August 12 in a concert of effusive energy but only sporadic elegance.

Mr. Botti has said unabashedly that the gauge of success for him is the ability to wow an audience: ďWhen the promoter wants you back, thatís what I keep my eye on. All the other stuff is fly by night. When you go see a concert, you want to have your head blown off. You want to see or feel something youíre not going to see or feel anywhere else. Iíve never had a hit song, ever. Nobody could whistle a Chris Botti song, but Iíve made it a priority to win people over, and I do that, one show at a time.Ē Judged by that standard, his show was a roaring success, as the terraced lawn outside the open doors at the rear of the hall was also full. I was seated inside and the audience smiled, tapped feet and bobbed heads through more than two hours of music without an intermission. They also gasped with appreciation, applauded loudly, and rewarded impressive solo performances with standing ovations.

If there was any disappointment for the crowd-pleasing Botti, it must have been that much of the audience left between the last number and the single encore. Perhaps that was understandable, since the average age of the audience in the main hall was at least 60, the concert was long and it was getting late.

I last heard Mr. Botti on tour at SF Jazz five years ago, and his bandís personnel has changed since then, as has its repertoire and its approach to the music. For example, several of the dewy-eyed, smooth jazz ballads from Mr. Bottiís early career were still on this program, but only as shadows of their former selves. An updated version of When I Fall in Love, the second tune on the program, began with a soft rock introduction, followed by a characteristic but skillful balladic rendering of the melody from Mr. Botti that gave way after eight bars to a farrago of tempos and feels, from high energy rock to salsa jazz. Next, introducing the groupís rendition of You Donít Know What Love is, a long-time staple of the trumpeterís repertoire, he promised to ďplay a jazz standard for about a minute, then the drummerís going to drive the band off a cliff.Ē It was a suicidal exercise that he aided and abetted by doubling and redoubling the tempo at the end of the first chorus.

And finally, as an encore, the group offered The Nearness of You, another smooth jazz ballad from an early Botti album, but here given a funky, two-beat treatment, at a tempo the group doubled twice before the end of the tune.

In between, there were substantial parts for various members of the band, including three vocalists, and they were sometimes accompanied by Mr. Botti, sometimes alone or with other members of the ensemble. Pianist Eldar Djangirov played Variations on Bachís Prelude in C-Sharp Major, a dazzling fusion of classical and jazz playing; Caroline Campbell, a long-time band member, contributed a violin extravaganza that found her not merely adding drama and expression (like most violin soloists) with flopping hair and impressively flashy bow work, but dancing and twirling across the stage then falling to her knees, with her head thrown back and her violin pointed to the sky, as she played on. Flashing strobe lights and artificial smoke added drama, if more was needed. And finally, Brazilian guitarist Leonardo Amuedo, drummer Lee Pearson, and bassist Richie Goods each had their turn as well, as did singers Sy Smith, Jonathan Johnson, and Veronica Swift. The last sang There Will Never Be Another You at breakneck speed and Embraceable You at a more relaxed tempo.

But at the end of the evening it was still unclear what glue, if any, held the music together. Mr. Botti has said that one of his job as a leader is ďto put together a Rubikís Cube of all-star musicians.Ē It is a difficult metaphor. Surely, the job of the leader is not merely to assemble musicians but to solve the Rubikís cube by aligning the different colors and elements so they form a coherent whole.

The driving force behind the performance seemed much more an admiration for awe-inspiring energy and technical skill than a common agreement about the emotional value of sonic depth and subtlety of expression. My colleague Philip Beard commented in a previous Botti band review on the excessively high volume levels in the hall, but volume adds energy, of course, as do jaw-dropping pyrotechnics--long, unbroken strings of sixteenth and thirty second notes, multi-octave chromatic runs and false-fingered tremolos. And so too does extensive use of heavily amplified digital instruments in place of the more subtle, timbre-rich sounds of acoustic ones.

Each of the supporting musicians in the concert had both kinds of instruments on stage and played them at some point in the concert. But Mr. Botti himself has long performed with an electronic pickup clipped to the bell of his horn, the output amplified and enhanced with reverberation. Unless you have heard trumpet soloists like Maurice Andre, Bud Herseth, Wynton Marsalis and Roy Hargrove in person, itís hard to explain what is lost when the natural resonance and timbre of the instrument and the playerís physical relationship to the horn is washed out by electronics.

The same thing is true of the differences between acoustic and electric bass, acoustic pianos and electronic synthesizers, and heavily miked bass drums and snares and the naturally balanced sound of a drum set. Not just in relationship to acoustics, but in other respects, less is often more in music, and it would have been nice to see more spaces between phrases, more dynamic range, more reflective and less notey improvised lines, and more careful listening and interaction among the members of the group, even during solos. As things stood, it was an impressive concert but not one for those with especially seasoned and sensitive ears.