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Choral and Vocal
SOMBER GERMAN POETRY IN SONG AT ROSCHMANN RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, February 18, 2018
Two weeks does make a hefty difference. Feb. 3 saw the diva Renée Fleming beguile a full Weill Hall house in a mix of Brahms, Broadway show songs and Dvorak chestnuts. It was a gala event with couture gowns and colorful extra-musical communication between singer and her rapt audience. Dorothea Rösc...
Chamber
KIM-PETERSEN DUO SHINE IN MILL VALLEY CHAMBER RECITAL
by Abby Wasserman
Sunday, February 18, 2018
“Bomsori” means “the sound of spring” in Korean, and violinist Bomsori Kim’s sound is like spring - fresh, clarion, and nuanced. Her expressiveness and obvious pleasure in engaging with audiences is substantial, and she partnered with pianist Drew Petersen in a Feb. 18 recital for the Mill Valley C...
Recital
ROMANTIC MUSIC AND AMBIANCE AT SEB ARTS RECITAL
by Nicki Bell
Sunday, February 18, 2018
Sebastopol had is own musical salon Feb. 18 with visits to Paris of the 1830s, and side trips to Wales and Germany. Pianist Robyn Carmichael presented a concert of favorite romantic masters and their muses, loves and inspirations, with music of Chopin, Liszt Mendelssohn and Schumann. This was no c...
Chamber
POWERHOUSE TANEYEV QUARTET IN TRIO NAVARRO CONCERT
by Sonia Tubridy
Sunday, February 18, 2018
Now in their 26th year of presenting chamber music as artists in residence at Sonoma State University, members of the Navarro Trio have performed, over the years, piano trios both famous and rarely performed, including many contemporary works. Mozart’s Piano Quartet in G Minor, K. 478 opened the Fe...
Chamber
NOVEL AND FAMILIAR WORKS FROM THE TILDEN TRIO
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, February 11, 2018
North Coast chamber music fans have the luxury of two fine resident piano trios, with the frequently performing Trio Navarro at Sonoma State, and the Tilden Trio at San Rafael’s Dominican University. The Tilden plays less often, but their Feb. 11 performance brought several hundred to Angelico Hall ...
Symphony
A FIFTH CONTENDER ENTERS THE RING FOR THE SANTA ROSA SYMPHONY
by Steve Osborn
Saturday, February 10, 2018
In these international times, what makes a piece of music American? For Michael Christie, the answer is that it needs to have at least premiered on these shores, if not been composed here. Thus the rationale for the “all American” program that Christie--the fifth and final conducting candidate for t...
Chamber
BERLIN WIND QUINTET'S NOVEL PROGRAM SCORES IN WEILL CONCERT
by nicholas xenelis
Friday, February 09, 2018
Driving into the Green Music Center parking lot Feb. 10 I knew there was something unusual taking place since the lot was nearly full. Was another event going on this same night? A large crowd in Weill Hall isn’t expected for chamber music, in this case with the Berlin Philharmonic Wind Quintet. S...
Recital
HAUNTING RACHMANINOFF WORKS IN HU'S MAO RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Thursday, February 08, 2018
Ching-Yun Hu made a return Music at Oakmont appearance Feb. 8 in Berger Auditorium, reprising a recital she made in the same hall four years ago. Many of the recital’s trappings were the same, but the music Ms. Hu chose to play was decidedly different. All afternoon the pianist was in an aggressiv...
Chamber
A COMPLETE ARTISTIC PACKAGE IN FLEMING'S WEILL HALL RECITAL
by Vaida Falconbridge and Mary Beard
Saturday, February 03, 2018
The diva Renée Fleming strode on the Weill Hall stage Feb. 2 in her first couture gown of the evening, a gray and swirling cream strapless sheath with flamboyant coordinating stole. For this concert, Ms. Fleming stayed to somewhat lighter fare, foregoing heavier dramatic and coloratura arias for a v...
Recital
ZNAIDER-KULEK DUO CHARMS AND CHALLANGES WEILL AUDIENCE FEB. 2
by Terry McNeill
Friday, February 02, 2018
Weill hall has mounted several exceptional piano recitals, with Garrick Ohlsson’s titanic Liszt concert, and of course Lang Lang’s two insouciant but also compelling performances topping the list since 2013. But arguably the virtuoso violinists have on balance been more impressive, and thoughts g...
RECITAL REVIEW
Green Music Center / Sunday, January 21, 2018
Greg Anderson and Elizabeth Joy Roe, piano

Greg Anderson and Elizabeth Joy Roe

ECLECTIC ANDERSON & ROE TRANSCRIPTIONS CAPTIVATE WEILL HALL AUDIENCE

by Nicki Bell
Sunday, January 21, 2018

From the first moment when Greg Anderson and Elizabeth Joy Roe walked Jan. 21 on the Weill Hall stage and spoke to the audience about their two-piano program, it was clear that an afternoon of drama, humor, virtuosity, warmth, transcendence and excitement was in store.

This dynamic and mesmerizing duo create many of their own arrangements, and the first half consisted of three opera fantasies.  Their first was based on the finale of Act I of Mozart’s “Cosi fan tutte” and enacted drama, romance, humor and scandal.  At one piano, their ten minute arrangement of pianistic Mozart was pure theater.  Mr. Anderson often glances at Ms. Roe at a seemingly cunning moment, and with her return glances the communication conveyed a sense of fun and even conspiracy.

The concert paraphrase from Ades’ opera “Powder Her Face” was taken from a real life story of the Duchess of Argyle who displayed lack of judgment, reckless behavior, narcissism and scandal, and who finally recognizes her errors and decadence. At the end a tango danced by an electrician and a maid over the Dutchess’ bed of shame, and the pianistic duo made the music glittering as though seen through shards of broken glass.  There were wonderful mixtures of colors, rhythms, melodies and dissonances, with soft chords building to loud and sometimes jazzy chords. The energy was palpable.

More drama and romance came with their “Carmen Fantasy” performance with themes taken from Bizet’s 1875 opera - jazzy, gypsy, sensuous, feverish, all full of virtuosity and speed.  Their two-piano performance was stunning.

Both the artists are warm and enlightening speakers with an audience, and at this performance the stories enhanced their instrumental skills. If the first half of the program was about scandal, drama and romance, the second was about transcendence, with musical statements addressing a human yearning. John Adams’ 16-minute “Hallelujah Junction” was built on repetition, the rhythm of the word “lujah” sounding over and over. At the end of the piece one could hear the whole word “hallelujah” at the climax.  This music was featured in the film “Call Me By Your Name”.  The repetition of the word led to a sense of timelessness and a hypnotic state similar to Catholic incantations or Buddhist chanting.  In three movements, each flowing into the next, the music became driving and intense.  

A very different mood was created with the duo’s arrangement of the Hallelujah Variations based on the cult
classic of Leonard Cohen’s song, the meaning of “Hallelujah” sifting through despair, yearning, ecstasy and praise  It was composed with the inspiration of Schubert and late Beethoven, a duet with eight variations. Through the Beethoven and Schubert mix the Cohen song was easily heard.

Paul McCartney’s song  “Let It Be” concluded the program.  Ms. Roe sang the song, with its gospel-inflected tone before they played their arrangement. It was dueling gospel pianists with an uplifting message and the full hall went crazy with stomping and yelling and clapping for more.

The encore was from Bernstein’s “West Side Story” and was played as a rollicking duet of “America” with the added percussion of hands slapping the piano and rapping knuckles against the instrument's wood fall board. Both artists hopped up to dance while trading places on stage. When the audience wouldn’t let them go, they played “What a Wonderful World”, a quiet work full of filigree scales that calmed the hall’s energy.