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Chamber
KIM-PETERSEN DUO SHINE IN MILL VALLEY CHAMBER RECITAL
by Abby Wasserman
Sunday, February 18, 2018
“Bomsori” means “the sound of spring” in Korean, and violinist Bomsori Kim’s sound is like spring - fresh, clarion, and nuanced. Her expressiveness and obvious pleasure in engaging with audiences is substantial, and she partnered with pianist Drew Petersen in a Feb. 18 recital for the Mill Valley C...
Chamber
POWERHOUSE TANEYEV QUARTET IN TRIO NAVARRO CONCERT
by Sonia Tubridy
Sunday, February 18, 2018
Now in their 26th year of presenting chamber music as artists in residence at Sonoma State University, members of the Navarro Trio have performed, over the years, piano trios both famous and rarely performed, including many contemporary works. Mozart’s Piano Quartet in G Minor, K. 478 opened the Fe...
Chamber
NOVEL AND FAMILIAR WORKS FROM THE TILDEN TRIO
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, February 11, 2018
North Coast chamber music fans have the luxury of two fine resident piano trios, with the frequently performing Trio Navarro at Sonoma State, and the Tilden Trio at San Rafael’s Dominican University. The Tilden plays less often, but their Feb. 11 performance brought several hundred to Angelico Hall ...
Chamber
BERLIN WIND QUINTET'S NOVEL PROGRAM SCORES IN WEILL CONCERT
by nicholas xenelis
Friday, February 09, 2018
Driving into the Green Music Center parking lot Feb. 10 I knew there was something unusual taking place since the lot was nearly full. Was another event going on this same night? A large crowd in Weill Hall isn’t expected for chamber music, in this case with the Berlin Philharmonic Wind Quintet. S...
Chamber
A COMPLETE ARTISTIC PACKAGE IN FLEMING'S WEILL HALL RECITAL
by Vaida Falconbridge and Mary Beard
Saturday, February 03, 2018
The diva Renée Fleming strode on the Weill Hall stage Feb. 2 in her first couture gown of the evening, a gray and swirling cream strapless sheath with flamboyant coordinating stole. For this concert, Ms. Fleming stayed to somewhat lighter fare, foregoing heavier dramatic and coloratura arias for a v...
Chamber
VIVID GERMAN ROMANTICISM IN VOM FESTIVAL CONCERT IN SCHROEDER
by Terry McNeill
Saturday, January 27, 2018
Though not new to Sonoma County, the Valley of the Moon Music Festival (VOM) concerts are relatively recent in the Green Music Center’s Schroeder Hall. So the first of three spring concerts Jan. 27 provided a picture of what’s in the repertoire leading up to their Festival this summer at Sonoma’s Ha...
Chamber
ECLECTIC ANDERSON & ROE TRANSCRIPTIONS CAPTIVATE WEILL HALL AUDIENCE
by Nicki Bell
Sunday, January 21, 2018
From the first moment when Greg Anderson and Elizabeth Joy Roe walked Jan. 21 on the Weill Hall stage and spoke to the audience about their two-piano program, it was clear that an afternoon of drama, humor, virtuosity, warmth, transcendence and excitement was in store. This dynamic and mesmerizing ...
Chamber
BALCOM TRIO HIGHLIGHTS DELPHI'S RAC CONCERT IN OCCIDENTAL
by Sonia Morse Tubridy
Saturday, January 20, 2018
The Redwood Arts Council audience first met the Delphi Trio (Jeffrey LaDeur, (piano), Liana Berube (violin), and cellist Michelle Kwon) in 2013, and subsequent concerts in the same Occidental hall have become crowd favorites. The January 20th program before a capacity audience seemed to have enthus...
Chamber
TETZLAFF QUARTET'S MASTERY IN MOZART AND SCHUBERT
by Terry McNeill
Saturday, November 11, 2017
German violin virtuoso Christian Tetzlaff presented a critically successful Weill Hall recital Feb. 18, and returned to the same venue Nov. 11 with his admirable Tetzlaff Quartet in a program of Berg, Schubert and Mozart. Clarity of ensemble has always been a hallmark of this Quartet, and contrapun...
Chamber
RAVISHING SHORT OPERAS FROM FRENCH TROUPE IN WEILL
by Terry McNeill
Friday, November 10, 2017
Standard Weill Hall fall and winter classical programs are pretty routine – symphonic music, chamber, solo recitals – so it was a rare treat Nov. 10 when just two works from the 17th century were gloriously presented. With such specialized compositions, period performers with commanding authenticit...
CHAMBER REVIEW
Sonoma State University Department of Music / Sunday, March 29, 2015
Trio Ariadne; Argento Ensemble, Michael Galante, conductor. Fredericka von Stade, soprano

Soprano Frederick von Stade

AUTUMNAL MAHLER SONGS BY VON STADE IN WEILL HALL CONCERT

by Mary Beard
Sunday, March 29, 2015

Sonoma State’s Music Department sponsored a farewell concert in Weill Hall March 29 for the Trio Adriadne, artists-in-residence for the last two years. Combining with the Trio (Carol McGonnell, clarinet; cellist Sæunn Thorsteinsdótter; pianist Elizabeth Joy Roe) was the Argento Chamber Ensemble, directed by of Michel Galante, and with the Ensemble the diva Fredericka von Stade. The Trio and the Argento gave the bulk of the program.

Each member of the Ariadne performed solo part in one of the pieces. Except for a short fragment of the unfinished Schumann D Minor Piano Concerto, all the works were contemporary, including a solo piano work by Mr. Galante, and early in the program he said “If you’re not used to hearing the contemporary medium of Western Music, I suggest you just listen and react; with each piece, you’re likely to love it or hate it.” And listening to comments from the audience, I’d say that was the case. Some of the works were quite interesting with lots of textural variety, and some were disturbing, ethereal, repetitive or annoying. For me, the two most interesting were a performance by Philip Edward Fisher of Mr. Galante’s “Megalomania,” which jumped all over the keyboard with a bombastic quirkiness, and Ligeti’s “Cello Concerto,” performed by Ms. Thorsteinsdóttir. It began with a single cello note, going from pppppppp to perhaps mp over a minute and a half, with other instruments eventually joining in on the pitch. It was very dreamlike but texturally quite intriguing.

The orchestra members and most soloists wore the traditional black concert attire, but when soprano Frederica von Stade came on stage for the concert’s last section, she wore black with a bright red scarf-like tunic which was exquisite and the presence of a splash of color was almost breath-taking after so much somberness.

It was also the first time all evening that true tonal color was heard as well and I basked in it. Up to Ms. von Stade’s singing there was much textural variety but nothing that felt personal and warm, and the artist immediately delivered intimacy and warmth with great depth of beauty.

Mahler’s “Songs of a Wayfarer” were written with the composer’s own lyrics in 1884-85, in the wake of his unhappy love for soprano Johanna Richter, whom he met while a conductor in the Kassel opera house. Later Mahler’s protégé Arnold Schoenberg scored the work for two wind instruments, piano, percussion and string quintet. Mr. Galante expanded this version to 15 players and this was what was heard accompanying Ms. von Stade. The sonic texture was not as lush as Mahler’s original, but it was surely personal and a provocative conversation of different instruments.

After 41 years on the opera and recital stage Frederica von Stade’s voice is as healthy, vibrant, and colorful as ever. It sounds as fresh as it did at the height of her career. She had some signs of a cold and cough at beginnings of very soft phrases, but it was truly an impeccable performance by a sterling artist. The four songs showed a range of emotions from distraught declamation to haunting melancholy, and eventually to vulnerable but optimistic acceptance of the new life journey ahead. The easiness of her voice seemed to pull the audience into the depicted pain, anguish, vulnerability and tenderness. In the first Song (“Wenn mein Schatz Hochzeit macht”) and the third (“Ich hab’ ein glühend Messer”) the chest tones were powerful.

The Ensemble played in elegant communication with the vocal lines, and in the final song (“Die zwei blauen Augen”) the singer established a melancholy tone, and half way through, when she sings of finding a linden tree to rest under (and showered by its blossoms) the subtle drama moved to a major key and a sunny sense of hope and newness of life.

Her diction was excellent and the German easy to understand in all parts of her range. She used very little physical gesturing to display emotion, but allowed her voice and face alone to display the grand palette of emotional color. She was a joy to watch and to hear.

The audience of 1,100, liberally sprinkled with singers, gave the artist a standing ovation. There was no encore.

Susan Witt-Butler contributed to this review