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CLARA SCHUMANN TRIO COMMANDS VOM CHAMBER MUSIC CONCERT AT HANNA
by Terry McNeill
Saturday, July 24, 2021
The Valley of the Moon Chamber Music Series has begun several virtual and a few live concerts in its new seventh season, some broadcast from Sonoma’s Hanna Center Hall and some in posh local venues. July 24’s video had a small live audience and a well-produced video program of three works. Titled “
Chamber
EXEMPLARY QUARTET PLAYING IN MENDO FESTIVAL FT. BRAGG CONCERT
by Terry McNeill
Wednesday, July 21, 2021
Faced with the impossibility of presenting concerts in the iconic large white tent on the bluff, the Mendocino Music Festival opted to use Ft. Bragg’s Cotton Auditorium for ten events in the abbreviated 35th season. San Francisco’s Alexander String Quartet played July 21 to a fully masked audience
Chamber
ECLECTIC PROGRAMMING AT PIANOSONOMA CONCERT IN SCHROEDER HALL
by Pamela Hicks Gailey
Tuesday, July 20, 2021
After a dark year bereft of live performance, pianoSonoma launched July 20 the first Vino & Vibrato concert of the 2021 season in Sonoma State's Schroeder Hall, albeit sadly senza vino due to Covid protocols. Three exceptional musicians showered the audience with an interesting variety of pia
Chamber
RARELY-PLAYED SCHUMANN HIGHLIGHTS HEALDSBURG RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Saturday, July 10, 2021
Brave New Music sporadically produces concerts in and around Healdsburg, and July 10’s violin recital in downtown St. Paul’s Church must have been one of the first post-lockdown, post-be-extra-careful classical music concerts in Sonoma County's summer season. New Music Founder Gary McLaughlin with
Chamber
ECHOS ON A WARM SUMMER NIGHT
by Abby Wasserman
Saturday, July 10, 2021
ECHO Chamber Orchestra’s first concert in a year and a half, “A Musical Promenade,” was a promenade indeed. When patrons arrived at San Anselmo’s First Presbyterian Church for the 6:00 performance July 10, they were funneled through the garden to the Duncan Hall patio, where folding chairs were set
Chamber
LONG DISTANCE LOVE BEGINS VOM SUMMER FESTIVAL
by Pamela Hicks Gailey
Thursday, June 24, 2021
The Valley of the Moon Music Festival offered a 7th season preview June 24 with a stunning online concert, aptly named Long Distance Love, featuring inspired performances of Beethoven's short song cycle An die ferne Geliebte,, and selections from Brahms’ beloved Liebeslieder Wal
Chamber
STYLISH HAYDN QUARTETS CLOSE GREEN ROOM SERIES
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, May 9, 2021
Completing the Green Music Center’s spring series series of “Green Room” virtual concerts, the St. Lawrence String Quartet played May 9 a lightweight program of two Haydn works. Lightweight perhaps, but in every way satisfying. The G Major Quartet (Op. 76, No.1) began the music that was supplement
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ECLECTIC CELLO PIANO VIRTUAL RECITAL FROM TOMKINS ZIVIAN DUO
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, March 28, 2021
The venerable 41-year Redwood Arts Council Series in Occidental has joined the virtual recital world with low budget but artistically satisfying programs, mostly using videos filmed in the performer’s residences. March 28 saw the Tanya Tomkins-Eric Zivian duo present an eclectic program from their
Chamber
NOVEL OBOE-HARPSICHORD RECITAL FROM AIKEN DUO IN UKIAH
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, February 21, 2021
Oboe and harpsichord recitals are a rare North Bay event, even in a pandemic environment where a formal hall setting isn’t available. So it was a delight Feb. 21 to experience on the Ukiah Symphony’s website a recital by Symphony oboist Beth Aiken and harpsichordist husband Tom. The Aiken home vis
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SPLENDID STRINGS IN A SUNLIT GARDEN
by Abby Wasserman
Sunday, November 1, 2020
A sun-drenched autumn afternoon, a Marin County garden and six superb string players from the Santa Rosa Symphony were manna from heaven to a pandemic-weary audience starved for live music. The sextet of Santa Rosa Symphony musicians performed to a small group of 20 Nov. 1, the day after Halloween.
CHAMBER REVIEW
Sonoma State University Department of Music / Sunday, March 29, 2015
Trio Ariadne; Argento Ensemble, Michael Galante, conductor. Fredericka von Stade, soprano

Soprano Frederick von Stade

AUTUMNAL MAHLER SONGS BY VON STADE IN WEILL HALL CONCERT

by Mary Beard
Sunday, March 29, 2015

Sonoma State’s Music Department sponsored a farewell concert in Weill Hall March 29 for the Trio Adriadne, artists-in-residence for the last two years. Combining with the Trio (Carol McGonnell, clarinet; cellist Sæunn Thorsteinsdótter; pianist Elizabeth Joy Roe) was the Argento Chamber Ensemble, directed by of Michel Galante, and with the Ensemble the diva Fredericka von Stade. The Trio and the Argento gave the bulk of the program.

Each member of the Ariadne performed solo part in one of the pieces. Except for a short fragment of the unfinished Schumann D Minor Piano Concerto, all the works were contemporary, including a solo piano work by Mr. Galante, and early in the program he said “If you’re not used to hearing the contemporary medium of Western Music, I suggest you just listen and react; with each piece, you’re likely to love it or hate it.” And listening to comments from the audience, I’d say that was the case. Some of the works were quite interesting with lots of textural variety, and some were disturbing, ethereal, repetitive or annoying. For me, the two most interesting were a performance by Philip Edward Fisher of Mr. Galante’s “Megalomania,” which jumped all over the keyboard with a bombastic quirkiness, and Ligeti’s “Cello Concerto,” performed by Ms. Thorsteinsdóttir. It began with a single cello note, going from pppppppp to perhaps mp over a minute and a half, with other instruments eventually joining in on the pitch. It was very dreamlike but texturally quite intriguing.

The orchestra members and most soloists wore the traditional black concert attire, but when soprano Frederica von Stade came on stage for the concert’s last section, she wore black with a bright red scarf-like tunic which was exquisite and the presence of a splash of color was almost breath-taking after so much somberness.

It was also the first time all evening that true tonal color was heard as well and I basked in it. Up to Ms. von Stade’s singing there was much textural variety but nothing that felt personal and warm, and the artist immediately delivered intimacy and warmth with great depth of beauty.

Mahler’s “Songs of a Wayfarer” were written with the composer’s own lyrics in 1884-85, in the wake of his unhappy love for soprano Johanna Richter, whom he met while a conductor in the Kassel opera house. Later Mahler’s protégé Arnold Schoenberg scored the work for two wind instruments, piano, percussion and string quintet. Mr. Galante expanded this version to 15 players and this was what was heard accompanying Ms. von Stade. The sonic texture was not as lush as Mahler’s original, but it was surely personal and a provocative conversation of different instruments.

After 41 years on the opera and recital stage Frederica von Stade’s voice is as healthy, vibrant, and colorful as ever. It sounds as fresh as it did at the height of her career. She had some signs of a cold and cough at beginnings of very soft phrases, but it was truly an impeccable performance by a sterling artist. The four songs showed a range of emotions from distraught declamation to haunting melancholy, and eventually to vulnerable but optimistic acceptance of the new life journey ahead. The easiness of her voice seemed to pull the audience into the depicted pain, anguish, vulnerability and tenderness. In the first Song (“Wenn mein Schatz Hochzeit macht”) and the third (“Ich hab’ ein glühend Messer”) the chest tones were powerful.

The Ensemble played in elegant communication with the vocal lines, and in the final song (“Die zwei blauen Augen”) the singer established a melancholy tone, and half way through, when she sings of finding a linden tree to rest under (and showered by its blossoms) the subtle drama moved to a major key and a sunny sense of hope and newness of life.

Her diction was excellent and the German easy to understand in all parts of her range. She used very little physical gesturing to display emotion, but allowed her voice and face alone to display the grand palette of emotional color. She was a joy to watch and to hear.

The audience of 1,100, liberally sprinkled with singers, gave the artist a standing ovation. There was no encore.

Susan Witt-Butler contributed to this review