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Symphony
ANDREW GRAMS FINDS HIS GROOVE SR SYMPHONY IN RACHMANINOFF
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, December 03, 2017
Last Sunday’s Santa Rosa Symphony concert featured two elegant and refined guests: music director candidate Andrew Grams and pianist Stewart Goodyear. Both displayed dazzling technique and consummate artistry, but Goodyear was the more consistent of the two. Some of Grams’ inconsistency may have st...
Symphony
SONIC SPLASH AND ENSEMBLE DELICACY AT SO CO PHIL CONCERT
by Terry McNeill
Saturday, November 18, 2017
Franck’s wonderful D Minor Symphony is a rarity on today’s concert programs, and I can’t remember a North Bay performance in many years from any of the six resident area orchestras. So it was good to see the Sonoma County Philharmonic feature it in their Nov. 18 and 19 concerts at Santa Rosa High S...
Chamber
TETZLAFF QUARTET'S MASTERY IN MOZART AND SCHUBERT
by Terry McNeill
Saturday, November 11, 2017
German violin virtuoso Christian Tetzlaff presented a critically successful Weill Hall recital Feb. 18, and returned to the same venue Nov. 11 with his admirable Tetzlaff Quartet in a program of Berg, Schubert and Mozart. Clarity of ensemble has always been a hallmark of this Quartet, and contrapun...
Chamber
RAVISHING SHORT OPERAS FROM FRENCH TROUPE IN WEILL
by Terry McNeill
Friday, November 10, 2017
Standard Weill Hall fall and winter classical programs are pretty routine – symphonic music, chamber, solo recitals – so it was a rare treat Nov. 10 when just two works from the 17th century were gloriously presented. With such specialized compositions, period performers with commanding authenticit...
Symphony
MEI-ANN CHEN PROVES A WORTHY CONTENDER FOR SANTA ROSA SYMPHONY CONDUCTING POST
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, November 05, 2017
These days the focus of Santa Rosa Symphony concerts is as much on the conductor candidates as on the soloists. This past weekend’s concerts featured the second of those candidates, Mei-Ann Chen, along with pianist Nareh Arghamanyan, each of whom cut an imposing figure on the stage. Chen is diminut...
Symphony
TO RUSSIA WITH BRILLIANCE
by Terry McNeill
Friday, November 03, 2017
Russian pianist Denis Matsuev’s high velocity and frequently slam-bang virtuosity came to the Green Music Center last year with a thrilling and equally perplexing solo performance. So many in Weill Nov. 3 were interested to hear if his pianistic style would mesh well in a concerto, and with a fine ...
Symphony
THUNDEROUS TCHAIKOVSKY FOURTH OPENS MARIN SYMPHONY SEASON
by Terry McNeill
Tuesday, October 31, 2017
North Coast weather is turning cool and the nights longer, ideal for Tchaikovsky’s big boned symphonies. The Santa Rosa Symphony recently programmed the Fourth (F Minor Symphony) as did the San Francisco Symphony. Norman Gamboa’s Sonoma County Philharmonic just played the Tchaikovsky First, forgoi...
Recital
RESPIGHI'S PUNGENT SONATA HIGHLIGHTS KENNEY-GUTMAN RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, October 29, 2017
Respighi’s B Minor Violin Sonata seems never to gain conventional repertoire status. Perhaps the great Heifetz recording is intimidating, and I can recall over many years just two local performances: Jason Todorov and William Corbett-Jones years go in Newman, and a titanic reading in March by Anne S...
Chamber
MIRÓ QUARTET AND JEFFERY KAHANE PROVIDE MUSICAL RELIEF FOR FIRE-RAVAGED SONOMA COUNTY
by Steve Osborn
Saturday, October 28, 2017
Sonoma County’s Green Music Center has stood silent but unscathed the past few weeks as the county begins to recover from the devastating fires that began on the evening of October 8, only a few hours after a Santa Rosa Symphony concert in the Music Center. Since then, concerts by the Symphony, the ...
Symphony
CONDUCTOR PLAYOFFS BEGIN IN SANTA ROSA
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, October 08, 2017
The Santa Rosa Symphony is calling 2017-18 “a choice season” because the next few months offer the audience and the symphony’s board of directors a chance to choose a new conductor from a pool of five candidates. Each candidate will lead a three-concert weekend set this fall and winter, with a final...
CHAMBER REVIEW
Creative Arts Series / Sunday, June 02, 2013
Vinaccesi Ensemble: Kirk Eichelberger, Susie Fong, Sarge Gerbode, Nanette McGuiness, Hallie Pridham, Jonathan Smucker and Kindra Scharich

Vinaccesi Ensemble June 2 in Santa Rosa

RARE BAROQUE GEMS IN CREATIVE ARTS SERIES CONCERT

by Joanna Bramel Young
Sunday, June 02, 2013

A small but appreciative June 2 audience heard in Santa Rosa's Resurrection Parish a delightful buffet of baroque vocal and instrumental works performed by the five-year old Vinaccesi Ensemble of Berkeley.

Nanette McGuinness soprano; Kindra Scharich, mezzo soprano; Jonathan Smucker, tenor; and bass Kirk Eichelberger bass joined lutinist/guitarist Adam Cockerham, cellist Hallie Pridham and harpsichordist Susie Fong in the concert of works by Venetian composers. The group is named after a lesser-known composer named Benedetto Vinaccesi who flourished in the late 1600's in Venice. Like Vivaldi, he once was master di coro for the spedaletto - a home for abandoned children in Venice. Very little of Vinaccesi's compositions remain, but his extant works have the charm and sophistication of his more well known contemporariies.

The concert opened with three “Canzonette” and “Madrigaletti” by Salamone Rossi Ebreo, scored for various combinations of voices, with accompaniment by the great six-foot long arch lute, harpsichord and cello. Moving from one passion to another the voices achieved a fine blend, the singers looking at each other at the ends of phrases in order to achieve a perfectly tuned pianissimo.

Next came a Largo from Vivaldi's lute concerto, which Mr. Cockerham played impeccably on his small baroque guitar, with tasteful pizzicato cello accompaniment. On each repeat, the guitarist added elegant and precisely played ornaments, holding the audience in rapt attention. The balance between guitar and cello was exquisite.

This reviewer was pleased with the single movement instrumental interludes between the vocal pieces and they “cleared the palate” for the vocal works to come. Ms. Fong played two movements from Scarlatti harpsichord sonatas, and Ms. Pridham performed a Largo from a Vivaldi cello sonata. It would have been nice to hear more ornamentation from the cello, but otherwise it was sensitively played.

Mr. Eichelberger's long cantata “Distant from his beloved” was one of the most moving works on the program. The Vinaccesi piece-- the story of Mirtillo who is lamenting his dear Amirilli -- is full of feverish love and torment. Mr. Eichelberger has a superb voice, moving effortlessly from high to rock bottom notes in the bass clef. He brought out the dramatic and soulful words of the poetry. Recitatives contrasted with arias which changed mood from phrase to phrase. A coloratura passage would end in a perfectly placed deep low note.

Marcello's Psalm XV (from the King James Bible) was a showpiece for Mr. Smucker. Great emotional ups and downs characterized this lyrical composition. The cello and harpsichord had a very animated accompaniment, with affecting melodies interacting with the voice, In the last verse the cello played a repeating descending scale against the more inventive vocal part. Mr. Smucker has a clear, assured voice capable of evoking every changing emotion.

A cantata by Barbara Strozzi, “Beautiful eyes,” was scored for soprano and mezzo,with many ascending dissonances and intricate interplay between voices. Strozzi's “Hercules in love” was another highlight of the afternoon, sung by Mr. Eichelberger. He captured the poignant humanity of Hercules' torment over his “fickle and treacherous” love.

Monteverdi's “Why do you flee, oh Phyllis?” was a trio for mezzo, tenor and bass with continuo. The intricate intermingling of the vocal lines, rich in harmonies and aching dissonances resolved finally to a satisfying consonance to end the program.