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Recital
BRINGING NOTES TO SHIMMERING LIFE
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, January 18, 2015
David McCarroll and Roy Bogas opened the 2015 “Sundays at Schroeder” series at the Green Music Center Jan. 18 in a recital that featured admirable virtuosity and a provocative repertoire. They began with Mozart’s two-movement E Minor Sonata, K. 304. The work is at turns is sinister and tranquil, a...
Symphony
AMERICANA WITH A FLASHING BOW
by Steve Osborn
Sunday, January 11, 2015
Mark O'Connor is an extraordinary fiddler, as he amply demonstrated via his bravura performance with the Santa Rosa Symphony on Sunday afternoon. Whether he is an extraordinary composer is open to debate. The audience had ample time to judge O'Connor's compositional skills during the program, half ...
Chamber
MOZART IN THE MIX
by Terry McNeill
Sunday, January 11, 2015
Napa Valley Music Associates 20th annual Mozart concert Jan. 11 was a mostly Mozart event at the Jamieson Ranch Vineyards, but five mostly romantic composers happily joined the musical mix. Jassen Todorov was the featured violinist in two Sonatas, the F Major (K. 377) and the B Flat (K. 378), partn...
Chamber
WINDS WARM LAKEPORT CHAMBER CONCERT
by Cathy Kaiser
Sunday, January 11, 2015
The cold winter weather, so common to Lake County in January, gave way to warm winds Jan.11 as the La Voce Del Vento Chamber Players presented their first concert of 2015 with guest pianist Aaron Ames. Formed in 1982 by bassoonist Ann Hubbard, La Voce Del Vento (The Voice of the Wind) introduced Lak...
RICH PALETTE OF CELLO COLORS IN ARRON-PARK OAKMONT RECITAL
by Terry McNeill
Thursday, January 08, 2015
Rachmaninoff’s haunting cello sonata highlighted Music at Oakmont’s first 2015 concert Jan. 8 in the retirement community’s spacious Berger Auditorium. In a reading that was both muscular and lush cellist Edward Arron and pianist Jeewon Park explored the ripe romanticism of the Russian’s 1901 G Min...
Choral and Vocal
ABS PERFORMS HANDEL'S MESSIAH IN TRIUMPHAL WEILL HALL DEBUT
by Joanna Bramel Young
Sunday, December 21, 2014
The American Bach Soloists (ABS) made their Sonoma County debut at Weill Hall December 19, performing the three-hour-long oratorio “Messiah” to a full house. In the 25 years since its founding in Marin the ABS has achieved world renown, and has long performed regularly in Belvedere, San Francisco, ...
Chamber
NEW CENTURY AND SF CHORUS CHARMS WEILL AUDIENCE IN CHRISTMAS PROGRAM
by Sonia Tubridy
Friday, December 12, 2014
On December 12 a good-sized audience came out of the cold evening into the warmth and light of Weill Hall, and soon the regal warmth and light of beautiful music filled the auditorium and hearts of those present. Violinist Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg with New Century Chamber Orchestra launched into a s...
Symphony
SYMPHONY'S STRAVINSKY A WIND AND RHYTHMIC FEAST
by Terry McNeill
Monday, December 08, 2014
Santa Rosa Symphony conductor Bruno Ferrandis put together a curious program mix Dec. 8 in Weill Hall that on paper promised a culture clash, but actually delivered a memorable musical experience. Composers often fashion suites from orchestral works, and just as often the shorter suite can be more ...
Recital
GOING BAROQUE!
by James Harrod
Sunday, November 30, 2014
Virtuoso organist Charles Rus returned to the Bay Area and Sonoma County November 30th to perform a dazzling recital of Baroque organ music. Mr. Rus channeled the souls of the great 17th century giants of organ composition into the beautiful newly installed pipe organ in Sonoma State’s Schroeder Hal...
Chamber
CLARINET VIRTUOSITY AND SONOROUS NEW MUSIC IN SCHROEDER CONCERT
by Nicki Bell
Tuesday, November 25, 2014
Some new music got a hearing Nov. 25 in Schroeder Hall when the Trio Ariadne, in their second year of SSU residency, played a world premiere as well as a repertoire staple. The evening’s small and appreciative audience was treated to a Poulenc Clarinet Sonata performance sandwiched between novel in...
SYMPHONY REVIEW

Pianist Keisuke Nakagoshi

MARIN SYMPHONY LAUNCHES SEASON WITH GERSHWIN PROGRAM

by Donna Kline
Sunday, October 04, 2009

The alluring and always enduring music of the American composer George Gershwin thrilled a capacity audience at the Marin Symphony season’s opening concert Oct. 4. While the composer is widely known for many popular tunes in his time, his musical genius is also sharply obvious in his orchestral works and more serious musical forms. Four of these works were heard in the Marin Center, captivating the audience.

The Cuban Overture, composed in 1931, was an inspiration from a brief visit to Havana where Gershwin endeavored to capture the rhythms of the Cuban Rumba. It is a relatively short work where the composer combined the Cuban rhythms with his own thematic material. Conductor Alasdair Neale led this rhythmic symphonic overture with great aplomb, a perfect opening to set the mood for an evening that was to be as distinctive as Gershwin’s unique talents. Special praise should also go to the principal clarinet and oboe performers as well as the outstanding percussion section.

The orchestra’s performance of Catfish Row Suite, an outgrowth of Gershwin’s opera “Porgy and Bess” (his last major work), was also a tour de force reading. Mr. Neale was in full command and control, consummate with section balancing. This suite is a carefully constructed musical précis of the opera score, as Gershwin took five sections from the opera and bridged them skillfully into a beautiful symphonic suite. All the familiar songs from the opera were performed, either by the orchestra or performed as solos. Concertmaster Jeremy Constant’s rendition of Summertime, banjo player Glen Deardorff’s interpretation of I Got Plenty of Nuttin’, and pianist Heather Creighton’s solo parts were piquant and telling..

Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue was the composer’s first attempt to write classical music in a popular style. And since the initial performance in 1924, Rhapsody in Blue has remained his most loved and frequently heard work in the literature for piano and orchestra. The pianist in this performance, Keisuke Nakagoshi, made his Marin Symphony debut and nimbly performed the piece with adroit musicality. From the opening clarinet glissando to the beautiful jazz and blues melodies, Mr. Nakagoshi blended into the orchestral fabric and displayed a consummate octave technique. A standing ovation was the reward for a stunning performance.

Completed in 1928, an American in Paris is the only known orchestral work from Gershwin with a detailed program. Inspired by a visit to Europe, Gershwin probably composed this work to describe an American tourist walking along a Parisian boulevard. The Rue de Harp? The Champs de Elyse? Near the Ile de Cite? From the angry noise of Paris taxi horns in the percussion section to the blues-like melody that follows, the orchestra kept the audience’s rapt attention. Under Mr. Neale’s leadership the orchestra captured the essence of post-war Paris in sound, sometimes perplexing and always exciting.

It was an auspicious open to the new season Last night’s opening concert was an inspiring and provocative beginning to the new concert season.